Potter of the Month: Chandra DeBuse

For the month of April…to help ring in spring…Chandra DeBuse!

Garden Treat Server with Snail, 2012

Garden Treat Server with Snail, 2012

Chandra and I met at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts a couple years ago.  Before we met, I was flipping through Ceramics Monthly magazine and stumbled on images of Chandra’s work. I was immediately struck by her playful pots and imagined how fun they would be to use. Her work is charming and cheerful, witty and whimsical.   Most importantly, the pieces I own put a smile on my face everyday.

Here’s a sneak peek of some of Chandra’s upcoming events and where you can find a piece of hers for your very own:

To celebrate spring, Chandra will post a virtual kiln opening of new work on her Etsy site (DeBuse Ceramics) May 15th.  Also in May (4-5), she will be at Baltimore Clayworks for a two-day workshop.  July 27th, Chandra will conduct a one-day workshop at Red Star Studios in Kansas City and in September (20-22), she will present her work and her processes at the Handbuilt Conference for CERF in Philadelphia.

For additional information, please visit Chandra’s website:  www.chandradebuse.com

Enjoy the interview!

How did you first get involved in ceramics?

My early experience with ceramics was most definitely NOT love at first sight.  I was drawn to the responsiveness of soft clay, but I lacked the discipline necessary to have any kind of success during my undergraduate ceramics class.  Fast forward a few years—I was working a stressful job and I needed a creative outlet, so I took a community clay class.  By that time, I had matured and gained discipline and everything clicked.  I couldn’t get enough.

What made you choose to attend a post-bacc program in ceramics? Can you talk a little bit about how that decision impacted your career path?   

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American Pottery Festival 2012

Going back to school after I had been working in clay for 8 years was a game-changer.  I had been gaining knowledge through community classes, books, magazines and workshops but I was really hungry to know more and academia seemed like a logical next step.  I took two clay classes at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln before applying to their post-bacc program.  Just being in the university environment helped me understand the culture of academic clay, filled in some gaps in my education and helped me start to think critically about my work.  The encouragement and generosity of the faculty, graduate students, and my peers helped me to sort out my vision for my own future.  As a special student, I was at an advantage because I was paying in-state tuition so I took some extra classes: an art history survey course, kiln building, and sat in on the graduate seminar, while working on my portfolio and applications to graduate school.  Being a special student was like being inside a magical bubble where I had a lot of opportunity and not a ton of responsibility.  Seeing how another program’s graduate department operated gave me insights that helped me navigate my own graduate school experience.   Oh yeah, and I made some good friendships that continue to this day.

With a background in psychology, how did you decide to pursue a Master’s degree in Ceramics? 

I have always had fluid ideas of career and education and some days I even ponder what I’ll study next.  After working in human services and nonprofit administration, I was ready for a career change, although I was not entirely sure where my MFA would lead.   I always felt that my undergraduate degree just scratched the surface of the field of psychology and I kept searching for a deeper understanding of the human experience.  That quest led me to making pottery and continues in the work I make today.

How do you feel that your formal education (including your psychology degree) prepared you for your career in ceramics?  

The practical on-the-job experience I gained between undergrad and grad school developed my skills in mediation, listening, problem solving, communication, record keeping, grant writing/reporting, time management, personnel management and statistics. I definitely drew upon those skills during graduate school and I have used every one of those skills as a potter! I feel that the life I lived before I found clay gives me not only appreciation but also a perspective that grounds me.

My work is much stronger because I went to graduate school.  Formal education taught me how to continue asking questions and improving on my ideas. I also grew to understand how educating others through direct teaching and presentation aids my own artistic

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Kansas City Studio, 2012

development.  The support I have received from the University of Florida ceramics community during school and since graduation has without a doubt pushed my career forward.school developed my skills in mediation, listening, problem solving, communication, record keeping, grant writing/reporting, time management, personnel management and statistics. I definitely drew upon those skills during graduate school and I have used every one of those skills as a potter! I feel that the life I lived before I found clay gives me not only appreciation but also a perspective that grounds me.

How would you describe your work?  How did you arrive at working this way?  

I make voluminous pots that incorporate narrative hand-drawn imagery and pattern, candy colors, and bouncing lines to impart a sense of play.   Because I learned about pottery-making in a relaxed community pottery studio, on my own terms, outside of an academic agenda, I approached clay in a very playful way. I trained myself to play with clay for 8 years before learning to think conceptually about pottery.  This shift in thinking was painful for me and I’m pretty sure it was painful for my instructors too.  My early forms and surfaces weren’t cohesive.  Working narratively is a straightforward way of communicating ideas.  I always loved drawing, but I didn’t seriously try drawing on pots until the summer

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Catch Platter, 2010

before my thesis year.  It all started with squirrels, which were always right outside the studio window.  Squirrels are just like students:  they are impulsive and obsessed with a goal.   A metaphor was born.


What is the inspiration for your pieces? 
How do you come up with new ideas?  Can you walk us through your creative process when coming up with new forms/ideas? 

My thesis installation was a retelling of my own graduate school experience:  a playful story of achievement through the eyes of a squirrel.  After grad school, I continued working under the same larger themes of play and achievement, but started working through different stories with different characters and landscapes.

The process of play remains an important part of my studio practice. My formula for creative play is:  low risk + high novelty.  Ideas are born in my sketchbook.  I’ll start with a doodle, turn that doodle into a character and think about the struggle that character is involved in.   I add details to the drawing, play with composition, edit down, and relate the story to the landscape of a vessel.   I throw forms on the wheel and handbuild, using soft slabs with molds that I generate out of clay, plywood and/or craft foam.  These inexpensive materials are easy for me to customize and quickly work through ideas about shape and form.  Even as a novelty junkie, I do believe that great pots are born from discipline and repetitive practice, looking with a critical eye and making adjustments for the next round.

I’ve always been attracted to your use of the narrative.  What comes first, story or form?

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Troublemaker Tumblers, 2012

 It depends on what I’m working on.  I use cups and plates to try out a lot of narratives, so the stories might change, but the forms stay the same.  My loose narratives are based on larger themes, such as achievement or play.  These larger themes tie my work together.  Casual observers may not make the connections between the pieces, but for me, they are all related.  The tiered treat server forms were conceived while I was developing my thesis.  The tiered forms tell the story of desire, as it relates to achieving a goal and reaching the reward.  When I include a character on a treat server, such as a snail or squirrel, they are involved in that struggle of getting to the highest tier.  The function of the server, to hold treats, is conceptually relevant to the story too. It is much different than if I were designing a server for fruits and vegetables. The result is a piece with layers of meaning.

I know that you’ve moved around a bit post-graduate school.  Could you describe some of the most influential or career changing experiences you’ve had?  

Being a resident artist at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts (Gatlinburg, TN) was pretty special.  The national summer workshop programming provided me with opportunities to meet renowned artists (like you!), host visitors in my studio, and give weekly public powerpoint presentations about my work.  There aren’t too many places that offer that kind of exposure.  I knew that continuing the momentum built during graduate school would depend on making a lot of work and finding an audience for my work.  I was lucky to land in two year-long residencies (Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach, FL and Arrowmont) that provided financial stipends and allowed me to devote the majority of my time to my artistic practice.

Being recognized as one of six emerging artists at the 2012 NCECA conference, being named an Emerging Artist in Ceramics Monthly magazine and delivering an NCECA-sponsored lecture during SOFA Chicago made 2012 a remarkable year.  This happened as I was preparing to make a transition to being a full-time studio potter.  The exposure certainly hasn’t hurt. 2013 has some big shoes to fill though.

Kansas City is a hotbed for ceramics.  Not only is it home to the Kansas City Art Institute, Nelson-Atkins Museum, Sherry Leedy Gallery, Red Star Studios, etc., but there are many private studios maintained by internationally recognized ceramic artists (like yourself) in the area.  Now that you’ve settled and set up a studio, can you describe what attracted you to Kansas City?  

It IS a hotbed!  There are countless benefits to living in a city with such a thriving clay and arts community.  Since moving here, I taught a community class at Red Star Studios, presented to the KC Clay Guild, and I am currently an instructional assistant at the Kansas City Art Institute.  My boyfriend Tommy, the Studio Manager at Red Star Studios, has done a lot to keep me connected to the arts community here.  If not for him, I would probably hole up in my studio way too much.

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Glazing, 2012

After living in some remote areas, I can really appreciate the access that Kansas City offers. I live a mile from Crane Yard Clay, which sells studio materials and supplies, there is even a packaging supply distributor where I can drive over and load the truck with bulk shipping materials, there’s a really cheap place that sells clean scrap upholstery foam.  No more harvesting foam from nasty side-of-the-road couches!  There are some really great restaurants (not just bbq!). When I moved here, I had a full calendar of show obligations, so I needed to set up a studio quickly.  I chose to rent studio space in a quieter place near the arts district.  The cost of living is moderate and I grew up just a few hours north of here, so Kansas City feels like home.

Was there a point in your career that you made a decision to sell your pots for a living? Could you describe how you came to that decision?  

That decision is evolving.  After graduate school, I wanted to spend 3-5 years primarily focusing on my artwork in an effort to build on the momentum I gained during school (I am in year 3). As it happened, I spent the first two years in artist residency programs.  While at Arrowmont, I began to find an audience for my work and started a mailing list to keep connected to the hundreds of people I met.  I have been working as an independent studio potter since last July, piecing together my income from selling pots, teaching and doing workshops.  It has been stressful at times and I have not got the pie chart of income figured out yet. There is much tweaking to be done with price points and time investments.  I am still pretty open-minded about opportunities that take me out of my studio, as long as they present chances for income, learning, and still leave room for me to make pots.

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Squirrel Treat Server in process, 2013

What does a typical workday look like for you?  How much do you spend on marketing vs. making?

I have yet to find “typical.”  So far, deadlines have driven my time.  Last summer and a little bit this fall, I was spending 14 hour days in the studio, preparing for shows.  Teaching, traveling, packing and shipping work, taking photographs, applying for things and writing articles have taken me out of the studio.  When I’m out of the studio, such as doing a workshop or setting up a show, I try to be mindful of marketing opportunities.  A snapshot of me teaching a workshop posted to the web on my blog or facebook page tells my story and serves as a marketing tool.  It not only connects with my audience, but defines who I am and what I have to offer.  Working with other organizations, such as AMACO and Northern Clay Center has resulted in media that has expanded my audience.

How does an artist go about acquiring business and marketing skills? What piece of advice would you give to others just starting out?  

Marketing efforts should reflect your brand identity, which should be cohesive with your artist statement.  If you want organizations to invite you to do workshops, make sure that your online content reflects that.  Share pictures of yourself giving workshops, record a little video demo and put it on Youtube.  Write a how-to article for a ceramics publication, present at NCECA.  If there is a product you love and use in your studio practice, reach out to the manufacturer and let them know.  It may lead to some kind of partnership that can lend exposure to your work.  There are many ways to tackle the marketing monster, but it’s all about finding your audience and creating opportunities.

There is a mythology surrounding a potter’s life and marketing efforts tend to lean toward, “crafting the mythology.”  I think there is a lot of truth to this, especially since it doesn’t make much business sense to promote an image of failure—even if that’s the reality.  Those who are actually making and selling their work and making a living are exceptionally disciplined and resourceful.  I have my eye on those people and I try to learn as much as I can from the ways they have structured their businesses.

What is your relationship with galleries (on and offline)?  How has that relationship changed over time? 

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Garden Treat Server with Snail, 2012

The internet is really changing the gallery/artist/collector relationship.  Well-respected galleries are able to reach a wider audience and lend credibility to emerging artists.  I prioritize galleries who have both a physical gallery and an online presence.  It is imperative that galleries selling online represent my work through beautiful displays, photographs and provide promotional materials, including catalogs, posters, print mailings and social media.  As my work has become more visible in the past year, keeping galleries stocked with inventory has been challenging.  David Trophia of Crimson Laurel Gallery in Bakersville, NC recently offered advice to “under-promise” and “over-deliver.”  It’s good advice and my mantra for 2013.

Although I want to maintain excellent relationships with galleries, the traditional gallery model of sales is not feasible as my only source of income.  Commissions, cost of studio rental, materials, labor, shipping and taxes eats away the profits of making time intensive work like mine.  I am currently researching opportunities to increase the potential for direct sales.

I know that you have an Etsy site where you sell your wares.  Can you briefly describe your Etsy experience?

My Etsy site (DeBuse Ceramics) has been open for 8 months.  Most of my sales through Etsy have been with people who are already familiar with my work.  The biggest challenge for me has been to allocate work to my Etsy site instead of sending it to other venues.  When you look at pure profit, it may seem like a no-brainer to focus on direct sales, but maintaining gallery relationships is a tremendous benefit.  My business plan includes increasing my Etsy listings. I will be launching a virtual kiln opening on May 15th on my Etsy site, where I will be listing 30 new pieces celebrating spring.

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Floral Cup and Plate in use, 2013

Finally, what advice can you give aspiring artists struggling to find their own voice/style? 

Collect what interests you in a sketchbook or binder.  Make a lot of work.  Seek feedback from people you respect.  Experiment with other solutions.  Allow yourself to play.  Write about your work often (what are the pieces communicating?  How are they doing that? How could they say it better?).  For me, giving a 5-10 minute power point presentation about my work always helps me to condense my ideas and verbalize my intentions.  More often than not the process of preparing a presentation leads to new ideas and gives my studio practice a kick in the pants.

For more info about Chandra and her work, please visit her website: www.chandradebuse.com

And…here’s a shortlist of what Chandra’s up to these days:

Upcoming Workshops:

BALTIMORE CLAYWORKS WORKSHOP: MAY 4-5, 2013, BALTIMORE, MD   HTTP://WWW.BALTIMORECLAYWORKS.ORG/CLASS/MTCLASSES/SPRING2013/WORKSHOPS/WS02_DEBUSE_WORKSHOP.HTML

RED STAR STUDIOS: 1-DAY WORKSHOP, JULY 27, 2013, KANSAS CITY, MO  HTTP://REDSTARSTUDIOS.ORG/WORKSHOPARTICLE/ARTS-WORKSHOPS-KANSAS-CITY.HTML

HANDBUILT CONFERENCE FOR CERF: SEPTEMBER 20,21,22, PHILADELPHIA, PA  HTTP://SANDIANDNEIL.COM/HANDBUILT-2013

Upcoming Shows:

VIRTUAL KILN OPENING, MAY 15, 2013 –FEATURING 30 BRAND-NEW PIECES CELEBRATING SPRING  WWW.ETSY.COM/SHOP/DEBUSECERAMICS

AKAR 2013 YUNOMI INVITATIONAL (ONLINE ONLY), APRIL 19 – MAY 17, 2013  HTTP://WWW.AKARDESIGN.COM/SHOWS/UPCOMING.ASP#SHOW126

SMALL FAVORS VIII, THE CLAY STUDIO, PHILADELPHIA, PA, MAY 3 – JUNE 2, 2013  HTTP://WWW.THECLAYSTUDIO.ORG/EXHIBITION/SMALL-FAVORS-VIII

Lorna Meaden: Potter of the Month

For the month of March…the one and only Lorna Meaden!  Lorna and I crossed paths numerous times before finally getting to work together at the Archie Bray Foundation in the summer of 2006.  Ever since I first saw Lorna’s work, I’ve been a fan…and in meeting her, I

throwing

became an even bigger one.  Anyone who knows Lorna, knows that her laugh is infectious and her company genuine.  Lorna’s pieces fit seamlessly into the home…their undeniable usefulness, exquisite craft and raw beauty make her work a perfect pairing for domestic life.

With the launching of this interview coinciding with a recent kiln firing, Lorna is excited to showcase her latest group of pots in the content of this post.  Unloaded from her wood/ soda kiln less than a week ago, these new pieces reflect every bit of Lorna’s warm and charming personality.

Next month, Lorna will be a guest workshop presenter alongside Doug Casebeer and David Pinto during Anderson Ranch’s Jamaica Field Expedition.  For more info about the Caribbean “Woodfiring: The Art of Fire” workshop with David, Doug and Lorna, click here.   May 24-26th, Lorna has scheduled a workshop at Taos Clay in Taos, New Mexico.   In June, she is part of a three person exhibition at Santa Fe Clay with Ben Krupka and Adam Field.  For additional info about Lorna and her work, please visit her fresh new website: lornameadenpottery.com.

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Coffee Pot, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

Without further ado…enjoy the interview and the pots (fresh outta the kiln)!

How did you first get involved in ceramics?

My interest for making pots began when I took a ceramics class in high school. I grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. Bill Farrell, then faculty at the Art Institute of Chicago, came to our class to do a demonstration. Watching him throw on the wheel captivated me. My interest in making pots only grew from that point forward.

Can you briefly describe your background and education?

I received a BA from Fort Lewis College in 1994, and an MFA from Ohio University in 2005. I did residencies at the Archie Bray Foundation and Anderson Ranch Arts Center following graduate school. I have been a studio potter for the past six years at my home in Durango, Colorado.

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Bowl, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

How do you feel that your formal education (undergraduate-graduate school) prepared you for your career in ceramics?  Is there anything you wish you had known before leaving school?

Well, my education prepared me in so many ways, including some that I’m probably not even aware of. I have to say that I think the most important, and most beneficial thing school offered me, was how to continually challenge myself.

How would you describe your work?  How did you arrive at working this way?

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Ewer, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

My work is utilitarian pottery. It is thrown and decorated porcelain, fired in a wood/soda kiln. Making this type of work has been a slow evolution of discovering what my interests are. I don’t feel like I ever really arrived at a certain type of work or way of working, but more that it has changed slowly over time as I have become interested in different things, and changed as a person. I continue to learn how to challenge myself.

Would you explain your attraction to functional ceramics?

I’ve always made functional pots from the day I started working with clay. When I think about what I want to make, I only see pots. Let’s just say I’ve never closed my eyes and imagined a sculpture…that’s a job for sculptors. I like the challenge of balancing the way something looks with the way it works. People have a simple understanding of pots, giving them a comfortable, basic place in people’s lives.

What is the inspiration for your pieces?  How do you come up with new ideas?  Can you walk us through your creative process when coming up with new forms/ideas?

Currently, most of my ideas come from making work. Making pots for a living requires working all the time. I don’t have as much time to do research as I used to. New ideas can sometimes come from seeing an object somewhere and wanting to make a clay version of it, like a watering can, for example.  I also find myself revisiting the same idea for years. Currently, I’ve come back to a wine ewer I made six years ago. I started making decanters

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Wine Decanter, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

for an upcoming show, and realized it was a shape I had made for my thesis show. I like it when I feel like I’m picking up where I left off a long time ago, but coming at it from a different direction. I look at what I’m making as a continuum of ideas, rather than me coming up with something new.

What advice can you give aspiring artists struggling to find their own voice/style?

Don’t look at ceramics magazines too much. It can have a way of either polluting your ideas, or making you feel self-conscious. There are plenty of places to look for source information outside of ceramics. The other piece of advice is, of course, to work really hard. I think if you make enough work, and you’re paying attention to what you’re doing; your own voice/style will emerge. It’s a tricky thing, figuring out who you are, but everyone is an individual, and people’s idiosyncrasies have a beautiful way of emerging.

You took considerable time between undergraduate and graduate school.  What made you decide to go back to school after years of being a studio potter in Colorado?  How did that time away from school inform your graduate education?

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Firing the Wood/Soda

Education was always encouraged in my family, so going to graduate school was a natural choice, on some levels, for me. I had been a potter for 15 years when I applied to grad school. I think I knew enough at that point, to know how much more there was to know. I wanted to make better work. I already had a good idea of what it was like to be a studio artist when I went back to school. I wasn’t as concerned with how I would make a living when I finished, as I was with making better work. I think that helped me focus during school.

It seems as though there were a couple of points in your career when you made a decision to sell your pots for a living (post-undergraduate school and post-graduate school)?  Could you describe how you came to those decisions?  Can you talk a little bit about how your audience/motivation might have changed/evolved?

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Place Setting, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

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Vase, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

Basically, all I’ve ever really wanted to do is make pots. So in order to support my habit, and still spend all my time in the studio, I have to sell my work. At certain point, if you make enough work, you have to get rid of it. My audience has changed a lot in the last ten years. I went from doing local art fairs and the farmer’s market to nationally recognized galleries. The galleries that represent my work do a great job connecting with an audience that appreciates fine craft and handmade objects. One thing that has changed is that I have to make a lot more money than I used to. Recently, I’ve been trying to reach a balance between selling my work locally, and sending to galleries. At different points I have thought I might want a teaching job. So far, I have wanted more time in the studio than a teaching job affords. I like to teach, but I really like to make work. It’s all a big balancing act that I haven’t figured out yet.

What does a typical workday look like for you?  How much do you spend on marketing vs. making?

On a typical day, I will go out to the studio around

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Teapot, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

8:00am and work until 6:00pm, or as late as 10:00pm, with a couple of breaks. I like to take a break and go to the gym during the day. I try to leave my compound at least once a day, so that I see some other humans. Working alone can be isolating, so getting out has become important. My schedule varies a lot depending on approaching deadlines. The way I work tends to be feast or famine. This has been one of the biggest challenges of being a studio potter. The ability to work “normal” hours has become elusive. One of my goals is to maintain a work schedule that is slow and steady, rather than binge and purge.

How does an artist go about acquiring business and marketing skills?  What piece of advice would you give to others just starting out?

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Tumbler, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

The way that I have developed business skills is through practice. I’ve always felt that being resourceful and doing things for myself is important. Because an artist’s income is relatively small, it is practical to become a jack of all trades. For example, I recently took a website design class, and built my new site, lornameadenpottery.com. It took a while for me to have the time to focus on building the site, but it seemed more sensible than paying someone else to do it, and then being dependent on them to update it. It would probably be wise to take some business and marketing courses.

What is your relationship with galleries (on and offline)? How has that relationship changed over time?  What are some of the other ways you market your work (studio sales/craft fairs/etc.)?

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Pitcher, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

I have developed some good relationships with galleries around the country. The places that represent my work tend to be clay focused. This is valuable in terms of the established audience that each gallery maintains. Crimson Laurel Gallery in Bakersville, North Carolina is a great example.  Although, they are in a somewhat remote location, they draw a wide range of customers, and do a great job of educating their customer base. I have made a recent effort to sell more work out of my studio. I had my second annual holiday sale in December. It was a great success. I think that having a balance between national and local participation in the field is important. I always remember something Doug Casebeer once said to me…”Cultivate your own back yard.”

You’ve attended numerous residency programs and presented at countless conferences/workshops throughout your career.  Could you describe some of the most influential or career changing experiences you’ve had?

IMG_1403_2I will always have a fondness for Archie Bray Foundation. I did two summer residencies there, 2005 and 2006. Sometimes it’s hard to explain how great the Bray is. The combination of the history of place, the location in Helena, and the wonderful people I was able to share my experience with, make it sentimental for me. Among the highlights were that Josh DeWeese as the director, Rudy Autio working  in the studio one summer, the International Symposium, and our softball team that lost almost every game in the local league, but had the most fun at the bar afterwards. Not only did my work grow when I was a resident at the Bray, but I also grew as a person.

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Flask, Wood/Soda Fired Porcelain, 2013

Anderson Ranch Arts Center continues to be an important part of my life as an artist. I took my first two-week workshop there in the summer of 2001. I participated in two field expeditions, one to Nepal and one to Jamaica. I returned as a resident artist in the winter of 2006. I have taught summer workshops there three times, and I will be a visiting artist for the upcoming field expedition in Jamaica in April. The Ranch has been an integral part of my development along  the way. I particularly value my travel experiences with Doug. He has made it possible for artists around the world to make connections and find inspiration.

In terms of experiences that have influential on my career, in 2007, I was a demonstrator at NCECA in Pittsburg, and at the Utilitarian Clay V: Celebrate the Object at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, TN. Both were incredible experiences. My work was not well known at that point. Participating at two national conferences in one year, was not only super fun and exciting, but also pushed my career forward.

How did you decide to settle and build a studio?  What were your must-haves when building your studio and choosing a location? 

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The Compound

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Firing the Wood/Soda

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In the Studio

For as long as I can remember, I wanted to have my own studio, kiln, and house. I have that now and I call it my compound. I never imagined I would be able to afford to own a house, especially in Colorado. My place sort of fell in my lap.  I was back in Durango visiting after I finished my residency at Anderson Ranch. A friend of mine was having health problems and needed to sell his place. He was an artist and wanted his place to go to another artist. He knew I would build a studio and a kiln and stay there. There are two houses on the property, making it possible to earn rental income. I did the math and figured out how to make it work. My brother and his friend built my studio building three years ago and I built my kiln two years ago. It has been five years since I bought the compound. It is the longest I’ve ever lived in one place since I left my Dad’s house. It’s not without challenges, but it has been good for me in many ways. I feel so fortunate.

Finally, What advice would you give to aspiring potters who are looking to set up a studio and make pots for a living?

Work hard, be resourceful, and don’t go into debt. You have to really want it to make it happen. It’s all worth it!

Again, for additional info about Lorna and her work, please visit her lovely new website: lornameadenpottery.com.

And…here’s a list of Lorna’s upcoming events:

6th Annual Triennial Canadian Clay Conference: Elementum: Form, Function, Feast. March 23rd, 2013, Shadbolt Center for the Arts, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

Jamaica Field Expedition with Anderson Ranch: Wood Firing: the art of fire. April 19th-27th, 2013. Good Hope Ranch, Jamaica.
Taos Clay: Taos, New Mexico, May 24th-26th,
The Art Center: Western Colorado Center for the Arts: Grand Junction, Colorado, July 20-21, 2013.